Azerbaijani activist arrested and detained: the Anar Mammadli case

Azerbaijani activist arrested and detained: the Anar Mammadli case

Anar Mammadli is an activist specialized in monitoring elections in Azerbaijan.

In 2008, his NGO was dissolved by justice. In 2013, in his report about the last elections, he concluded that the Azerbaijani elections were not democratic. The same year he was arrested and placed in custody.

The European Court of Human Rights concluded that his arrest was purely political. The reason of his detention was to silent him.

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North Macedonian politician condemned for defamation

North Macedonian politician condemned for defamation

 Jani Makraduli is a North Macedonian politician. When he was in opposition. Mr Makraduli made statements about public rumours of corrupt activities by a senior government figure, the then Head of the Security and Counter Intelligence Agency.  

The subject of the rumours successfully sued Mr Makraduli for defamation, resulting in a criminal conviction.

The European Court for Human Rights found that Mr Makraduli’s freedom of speech had been violated.  

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Azerbaijani human rights activist arrested

Azerbaijani human rights activist arrested

Mr Rasul Jafarov is an Azerbaijani  lawyer, a human rights activist and the chairman of the Human Rights Club. He’s known to be a great and active defender of human rights. In 2014, he was arrested and placed in detention because of  his human rights activities.

The European Court of Human Rights found that Mr Jafarov had been unlawfully arrested, the only reason of his arrest was for punishing him and silenced him.

The Court recalled that this case is a part of similar cases where authorities unlawfully arrested human rights activists who was in relation to international authorities for silencing them.

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Unlawful detention of human rights defenders in Azerbaijan: the Rashad Hasanov case

Unlawful detention of human rights defenders in Azerbaijan: the Rashad Hasanov case

Rashad Hasanov, Zaur Gurbanli, Uzeyir Mammadli and Rashadat Akhundov are four activists and members of NIDA civic movement. They fight for liberty and peace in Azerbaijan.

In 2013, they organized protests about governement actions.

The same year, they were all arrested and placed in custody for the organization of these events.

The European Court of Human Rights found that their arrest was politically motivated. The reason of their arrest was to punish them for having criticized the government.

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Violations of right to peaceful assembly and fair trials in Ukraine: the Vyerentsov case

Violations of right to peaceful assembly and fair trials in Ukraine: the Vyerentsov case

In October 2010, Oleksiy Vyerentsov was arrested and sentenced to three days administrative detention. His crime: organising a peaceful demonstration in protest against corruption in the Ukrainian prosecution service. Left with inadequate time to prepare his defence, and deprived of the opportunity to consult with a lawyer, Oleksiy decided to lodge a complaint with the European Court of Human Rights.

In its judgment, the Court found several violations of the European Convention including the right to peaceful assembly and the right to a fair trial.

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Restrictions to freedom of speech in Turkey: The case of journalist Abdurrahman Dilipak

Restrictions to freedom of speech in Turkey: The case of journalist Abdurrahman Dilipak

Abdurrahman Dilipak has spent four decades as a journalist and human rights activist in Turkey. His writing would come to an abrupt halt in August 2003 after publishing an article criticising high ranking members of the Turkish military. Charged with “damaging hierarchical relations within the army,” and “denigrating the armed forces,” he spent six and half years defending his rights before the criminal courts.

In September 2015, the European Court of Human Rights ruled in his favour, finding that the criminal proceedings constituted an attempt “to suppress ideas or opinions considered as disruptive or shocking.”

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Violations of right to peaceful assembly in Turkey: The Oya Ataman case

Violations of right to peaceful assembly in Turkey: The Oya Ataman case

On 22 April 2000, Oya Ataman took to Sultanahmet Square,Istanbul, in protest against prison conditions in Turkey.  Despite posing no threat to public order, Turkish authorities subjected Oya and several of her colleagues to arbitrary arrest and repelled them with pepper spray, a nerve agent capable of causing respiratory problems, nausea, vomiting and spasms.

In December 2006, The European Court found a violation of article 11 of the European Convention of Human Rights, protecting the right to peaceful assembly.

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Restriction to broadcasting licensing and freedom of expression in Bulgaria: the Anatoliy Elenkov case

Restriction to broadcasting licensing and freedom of expression in Bulgaria: the Anatoliy Elenkov case

In October 2000, Bulgarian authorities refused to grant Anatoliy Elenkov a licence for his religious radio show, depriving him of both a means of income and the ability to share his religious faith with others. After deliberating in secret and refusing to let Antoliy know the reasons for its decision, the committee charged with reviewing such cases dismissed the radio show host’s appeal.

The European Court of Human Rights held that Anatoliy’s right to impart information and ideas and to be granted an effective remedy had been violated.

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Failure to investigate alleged ill-treatment by police officials in Croatia: the Durdevic case

Failure to investigate alleged ill-treatment by police officials in Croatia: the Durdevic case

On 16th June 2009, Danijel Đurđević—alongside his mother Katica Đurđević—were brutally beaten. They alleged that the attack had been carried out by Croatian police.

In its judgment, the European Court of Human Rights ruled that the state had failed in its duty to carry out an investigation into allegations of ill-treatment by state officials. The state attorney general had lacked both transparency and independence.

The allegation of police ill-treatment has still never been properly investigated - along with three other similar cases, where violations were found by the European Court.

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Freedom of expression in Romania: the case of whistle-blower Constantin Bucur

Freedom of expression in Romania: the case of whistle-blower Constantin Bucur

At a press conference in May 1996, Constantin Bucur publicly revealed that the Romania authorities had been illicitly intercepting the phone calls of journalists, politicians and members of civil society. As punishment for his whistle-blowing, Constantin was imprisoned for two years. The case reflects …

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Georgiy Gongadze and freedom of expression in Ukraine

Georgiy Gongadze and freedom of expression in Ukraine

Georgiy Gongadze—a journalist and longtime critic of human rights practices in Ukraine—was kidnapped and brutally murdered in 2000. The European Court of Human Rights found that the authorities had failed to take seriously the numerous threats that Georgiy had encountered in the run up to his death. The case remains unimplemented, because journalists in Ukraine continue to be threatened and assaulted on a regular basis - and the Gongadze case has never been properly investigated. EIN member the Ukrainian Helsinki Human Rights Union advocates for the full implementation of the case, through the establishment of proper protections of all journalists.

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Human rights defender Intigam Aliyev waits for justice

Human rights defender Intigam Aliyev waits for justice

Intigam Aliyev is an Azerbaijani lawyer and human rights activist. He was arrested and imprisoned for his human rights activities. Intigam was eventually released from jail and proved his case at the European Court of Human Rights. However, he has still not been pardoned, lives under a travel ban, and is still barred from conducting his important human rights work. His case reflects widespread persecution of human rights defenders in Azerbaijan, who are continually targeted for political reasons.

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